November 1, 2018 ______________________________________________________________________________________

Synod ends, calling women's inclusion in Catholic leadership a

'duty of justice'


Joshua J. McElwee, ncronline.org | October 27, 2018

A worldwide gathering of hundreds of the Catholic Church's prelates ended Oct. 27 with the issuing of some of the global institution's strongest language yet for the inclusion of women in its all-male decision-making structures, calling the matter a "duty of justice" that requires a "courageous cultural conversion."

Read More




Contents

  • Synod ends, calling women's inclusion in Catholic leadership a 'duty of justice'
  • Youth synod Catholic Church crises -- youth, celibate clergy and a lack of leadership roles for women
  • Women's Ordination Worldwide parallel events to Synod in Rome October 2018
  • Catholic Women Called - Nancy Corran
  • Free access to on-line or pdf downloadable books and book-length articles
  • Homilies
  • Requesting a private discussion with the pope...Questions from a Ewe - October 6, 2018
  • What Happened to the Church?
  • Secrecy begets continuity of immorality and illegality, and the Church has perfected secrecy
  • October was National Domestic Abuse Awareness Month in Canada and Catholics share the challenges they faced escaping their own situations with and without the help of the Church
  • RCWP Canada Bishop's Message
  • Binding The Strong Man
  • Nobel Peace Prize-winner gynecologist shaped by his faith Denis Mukwege inspired by Pentecostal pastor father 'mends women'
  • Give Us This Day short videos on the lives of Oscar Romero and Dorthy Day
  • Visions and Vocations book launched by Catholic Women Speak
  • An Empire of Misogyny?
  • Comments to the Editor
  • Tech Tip
  • Francis, the comic strip
  • Links to related information




Search
index site map advanced
search engine by freefind




       

RCWP Canada Bishop's Message

Why priests?

What does it mean to be a priest? Five years ago Garry Wills wrote a book, “Why Priests?” Amidst the sex abuse scandals that continue to plague the male hierarchy of the church these are good questions to ponder. As Roman Catholic Women Priests we are often asked “Why?” “Why do you want to be a priest?” “What is a priest anyway?” “Does one have to have an ordained priest to celebrate Eucharist since we share in Christ's priesthood by our Baptism?”

For me, priesthood is a calling to live my Baptismal commitment at a deeper level. It is a call from God; it is a vocation. Although I was told, when I first named my call to be a priest at around age 12, that I couldn't be one--only boys could be priests, I know in the core of my being that my call to priesthood is real and it is true.

By ordination, through the laying on of hands and the prayer of consecration, I became a priest empowered by the Holy Spirit to minister with, to and for the People of God. As priest my responsibilities are to serve the community by: 1) leading the community in prayer and worship (Christ as priest), 2) preaching the Gospel by proclaiming the Word and living it (Christ as prophet), and 3) providing pastoral services (Christ as king or servant leader).  Roman Catholic Women Priests strive to model the church we want to see: an inclusive  community living the radical discipleship of Jesus who came to show the world the face of God.

An important aspect of the role of the priest is the embodied expression of the unity of all in Christ. The office of priest is the point of unity of the local community with the universal church where all are one through, with and in Christ. In the role of presider at Eucharist, the priest leads and supports the people in the great thanksgiving prayer of the church in which Christ is present in the community, in the Sacred Word and in the Holy Meal. The community shares the prayer of consecration, either by saying the words with the priest or by the Great Amen at the conclusion of the prayer, which is giving assent to what went before. Both the priest and the people are necessary active participants in the Eucharistic prayer. Throughout the world there are many expressions of this, yet Christ is not divided but the one in whom all things hold together.

By Ordination the priest is recognized as a competent professional spiritual and religious servant leader. A candidate for ordination completes a rigorous program of preparation and prayerful discernment with spiritual direction and pastoral mentorship, and demonstrates adequate ability to serve as a priest. We expect a level of expertise in those who care for us at all levels of well-being: physical, emotional, social, and spiritual.

In future messages I will discuss the prophetic role and servant role of priestly leadership.

+Jane

[Jane Kryzanowski, Regina, SK, is bishop for RCWP Canada.]





Binding
The
Strong
Man

Radical Discipleship, radicaldiscipleship.net | Ordinary Time, 2018, Year B of the Revised Common Lectionary

As we transition into the summer months of Ordinary Time, we are celebrating the 30th anniversary of Binding The Strong Man, Ched Myers’ extraordinary political reading of Mark’s Gospel

[
For each Sunday of Ordinary Time, RCWP Canada semi-Monthly Review  posts links to Myers' comments.]




Nobel Peace Prize-winner gynecologist shaped by his faith Denis Mukwege inspired by Pentecostal pastor father 'mends women'

Lucie Sarr, international.la-croix | October 11, 2018
 
Congolese gynecologist Denis Mukwege, known as "the man who heals women victims of rape," was awarded the Nobel Peace on Oct. 5 along with 25-year-old Nadia Murad, a former sex slave at the mercy of the Islamic State (IS) in Iraq.

Mukwege, 63, is a committed Pentecostal Christian and the son of a pastor. The famous physician followed in his father's footsteps by also becoming a minister at a Pentecostal church in his home city of Bukavu, the capital of South-Kivu province in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).

Read More




Give Us This Day short videos on the lives of Oscar Romero and Dorthy Day



Give Us This Day and The Sheen Center For Thought & Culture come together to tell the story of ordinary men and women whose extraordinary lives inspire the moral imagination and give witness to the myriad ways of holiness.

The text for these short videos is taken from Blessed Among Us by Robert Ellsberg and drawn from the acclaimed column of the same name in Give Us This Day.

Watch videos




Visions and Vocations book launched by Catholic Women Speak



Adapted from vidimusdominum.org | November 1, 2018

Catholic Women Speak (CWS) launched their anthology, 'Visions and Vocations' on October 1, 2018, at the Pontifical Antonianum University, Rome.  This book reprints an interview by VOF alumnus mother/ daughter duo Astrid and Gaya, a talk from Zuzanna Radzik on the female role models and Mary McAleese's impassioned speech at last years IWD event in Rome.

This year, CWS has compiled a second collection of theological reflections and personal narratives by Catholic women – Visions and Vocations (Paulist Press, 2018) – to coincide with the Synod of Bishops on Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment. Contributors include more than 60 women and girls from 20 different countries, ranging in age from 14 to 85.

At this time of crisis in the Roman Catholic Church, CWS believes it is more important than ever to draw attention to the absence of women’s voices from the Church’s leadership and decision-making processes, and to bring to the table the rich insights and wisdom of Catholic women from many different cultures and contexts around the world.

CWS is a global network of women who love the Church and are sustained by and committed to our Catholic faith. That is why we believe that we must stand up and speak out in the struggle for a Church that better reflects the justice, mercy and compassion of God, and that responds to the call to be a community of equals in Christ without divisions of race, class, gender or nation (cf. Galatians 3: 26-28).

Paulist Press      Amazon.ca     Amazon.com




An Empire of Misogyny?

Tina Beattie, catholicwomenspeak.com | November 1, 2018

This 10-page article by Tina Beattie was translated into Italian for publication in MicroMega, April 28, 2018, in a special edition on the Vatican and Pope Francis. Here is the original text in English:

In the early days of Pope Francis’s papacy, many hoped that he would bring about greater representation and participation of women in the church, but five years on it seems unlikely that he is going to make any significant difference in this area. He appointed a commission to investigate the possibility of women deacons,[i] but more than a year after it finished its work the report still has not been published. He has appointed a number of women to senior posts in the Vatican, but these are drawn from a small range of predominantly Italian Catholics who do not represent the diversity of Catholic women’s cultures and practices. I admire Francis and I welcome the changes he has brought about, but more and more women today are asking why so little is being done to address our concerns.[ii]

Sub-titles of this article:

An Empire of Misogyny?

The Ambivalence Surrounding the Place of Women in the Church

The Symbolic Woman and the Female Body

Gender, Sexuality and Motherhood

Women, Priesthood and Fear

Embracing Difference, Celebrating Mystery

Read More




Tech Tip

This page looks good on a tablet or smart phone.  Enlarge to one column at a time for easier reading.




 Special
 Feature



Youth synod Catholic Church crises -- youth, celibate clergy and a lack of leadership roles for women


Myron J. Pereira, international.la-croix | October 12, 2018
 
The synod assembly on youth is being planned and discussed by senile old men. Amusing, but also tragic. It is sometimes said that the Catholic Church today faces three crises, all of its own making.

The first is the crisis of a celibate clergy, which has exploded into the crisis of paedophile priests and a corrupt hierarchy that colluded with them. This used to be passed off as an "American" problem — until we realized that it is global — there are priest predators in Latin America, Europe, Africa and even in India, the sexual molesters of Catholic women.

The second crisis centers on the lack of leadership roles for women in the church. At this moment, this is still largely an issue in the West, but like the recent #Metoo movement, the social media makes its momentum felt across the universal church. Women — educated, competent and dedicated — will no longer be relegated to arranging flowers on the altar and singing in the choir. Nor will they be put off by bogus theological arguments and references to canon law. They want a significant role in the running of the church, and they want it now.

Read More




Women's Ordination Worldwide parallel events to Synod in Rome October 2018

Women's Ordination Worldwide | October 2018

The Synod of Bishops is meeting in Rome throughout October to discuss "Young People, Faith, and Vocational Discernment," behind closed doors.

But a group of men gathered behind closed doors is no way to talk about the next generation of our Church and their faith and vocations. Women's Ordination Conference were on the ground in Rome, demonstrating through an alternative event that there is another, better way to dream a future for Catholics.

WOC's parallel event directly challenged the closed door
sessions of the Synod, where women's voices and vocations
were marginalized or silenced.


View more commentary, photos and videos




Catholic Women Called - Nancy Corran

Catholic Women Called, Youtube video






Free access to on-line or pdf downloadable books and book-length articles:


195 Reasons Why Women Should Be Ordained
       by Editor, RCWP Canada Monthly Review
       
Women Priests -- Answering the Call
      by Catherine Cavanaugh

Gaudete et Exsultate
     by Pope Francis

Why Women Should Be Priests
     by Roy Bourgeois

Women Priests - A Catholic Commentary on the Vatican Declaration
      edited by Leonard Swidler and Arlene Swidler


Dancing My Life, Dancing My God 

      by Judith Pellerin





Homilies

Editor, The Review | November 1, 2010

The following list of live links will take you to a wealth of homily material for preachers or long-suffering lay-faithful.  All homilists follow the Revised Common Lectionary.

These links are brought forward and will remain here on this page of The Review for a few issues, but now or later can be accessed by clicking on the permanent link Homilies at the bottom of this page.














Sunday Homilies by Judy Lee, RCWP-USA









Sunday Homilies following the Revised Common Lectionary by Samantha Crossley

Pope Francis' Homilies
   at SANTA MARTA




Requesting a private discussion with the pope...Questions from a Ewe - October 6, 2018

"Test everything; retain what is good.” (1 Thes 5:21) A laywoman expresses concerns about issues in the Roman Catholic Church to foster positive dialogue by posing and exploring questions. Please remember that Canon Law says it is not only a right but a duty to question the church. Also, Canon Law provides an over-riding power to the sensus fidelium (sense of the faithful). By this, Canon Law says that if the sensus fidelium (collective of the faithful) reject a law, it is not valid.

Dear readers,

About a month ago I wrote regarding needed changes to Canon Law that would help eliminate the Church’s globally systemic sexual abuse coverup scandal.  I received a lot of encouragement to share my ideas with hierarchy officials.  Thus, I sent it to my bishop.  He thanked me for offering my ideas. However, I do not know what other actions it will inspire beyond sending me a nicely worded email message.

As luck would have it, I have a business trip scheduled to Rome later this month.  Therefore, I replied to my bishop that I would like his help requesting a private discussion with Pope Francis regarding my ideas. 

Read More




What Happened to the Church?


Arthur Jones, ncronline.org | October 11, 2018

Conclusions to Part 2:

Publish all church accounts everywhere, especially in Rome, and certainly in their entirety. Add in the requirement that cardinals, archbishops, bishops and priests must submit an audited account of their own worth and holdings prior to retirement. Most of the money they handle is not theirs, though many treat it as such.

What else? Admit women to the highest offices. That would end the male cult, and create sufficient chaos for a couple of Councils to sort out.

Finally, male or female, permit priests to marry.

That's it. That's what happened to the Catholic Church.

Many voices can contribute to the how of banishing the secrecy in the Catholic Church. Most banishments would take but several strokes of the papal pen.

Read More (Part 2)
Link to Part 1




Secrecy begets continuity of immorality and illegality, and the Church has perfected secrecy

Steven Lanoux, Special to The Review | November 1, 2018

I'm sure many of you have read Part One and Part Two of the articles by Arthur Jones in recent issues of ncronline.org.  If not, both are worth the time to peruse reporting of factual matters, not hysteria or one-sided opinions.

Two things that leap out at me are:

1. Secrecy begets continuity of immorality and illegality, and the Church has perfected secrecy.

2. Celibacy was mandated about 1100 AD in order to eliminate ownership claims against Church property by priests' heirs--it was all about the money, had nothing to do with holiness or "marriage to the Church" or other such nonsense.

Even though factual and reported in journalism style, the articles cannot disguise Mr. Jones revulsion at some of the behaviors happening behind the scenes.  He also points out aspects of the Church bureaucracy and management that are admirable.

The latter gives some hope that there is a foundation for revision and healing.  But the key players have to be changed.

[Steven Lanoux is a member of Call To Action--Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, TX]




October was National Domestic Abuse Awareness Month in Canada and Catholics share the challenges they faced escaping their own situations with and without the help of the Church

Agnieszka Ruck, Canadian Catholic News | October 23, 2018

Nothing could have prepared Adelaide for the nightmare that was 18 years of her life.

She had married that many years ago, having checked off the stereotypical "Catholic" boxes: She saved sex for marriage, was wed to a Catholic man and was open to having as many children as God gave them.

However, just weeks after her wedding, things took an unexpected turn: Her husband was becoming manipulative. It wasn't through drunken tirades or threats of violence but through alternating periods of silent treatment and rage.

Read More







As usual, an engaging edition of The Review. I especially enjoyed reading Marc Etling's article (The Review, October 15, 2018), and have felt the same way for the last couple decades. When the celebration reaches that point, my response is: Lord, You make me worth to receive, and Your word heals." I will let God be the judge of my intent....I also enjoyed reading Steven Lenoux's article (
The Review, October 15, 2018), so true. Keep up the good work!

Oh, forgot to mention how much I enjoyed Emil Kutarna's reflections
(The Review, October 15, 2018) as well, lots of good points to ponder and practical proposals!

[Anonymous]


                                                                                                       




 RCWP Canada | Eucharistic Communities Ordinations Contact | Search | Archives Donate | Are you called to be a priest?
 Homilies |
Francis Comic Strip Archive | Facebook
 
Bible | Catechism of the Catholic Church | Code of Canon Law | Vatican II Documents | Vatican II Voice of the ChurchVoices of Faith
Salt + Light Television | Sunday Liturgy Preparation | Daily Bread | National Catholic Reporter
| Mother Pelican |
Catholic Women Preach
RCWP-USA | Women's Ordination Conference | Women's Ordination Worldwide | ARCWP




Home| About Us | Contact Us | ©2018 RCWP Canada