Promoting a renewed ordained ministry in a renewed Roman Catholic Church

February 1, 2019
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Open letter to Bishop Lionel Gendron, President Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, Canadian delegate to Worldwide Meeting of Bishops on Abuse Crisis

The ongoing worldwide scandal of clergy sexual abuse and cover-up dramatically affects all of God's people. Sexual abuse of any kind is a crime which must be reported and dealt with by civil authorities so that justice can truly be served.  Healing the spiritual wounds suffered by victims of abuse requires that Church authorities listen with the heart of Christ if the Church is to heal this wound to the Body of Christ.  Pope Francis has responded by convening a meeting of the heads of bishops' national conferences in February which you will be attending on behalf of the people of God in Canada. As faithful women and men who love the Church, we hope you will consider the following observations and recommendations, and carry them to this meeting.

Pope Francis has stated, “To say 'no' to abuse is to say an emphatic 'no' to all forms of clericalism.”  (Letter to the People of God, par. 2.4)  We agree that clericalism is a key issue because it maintains the Church's clergy/lay structure, which is seriously flawed since it reserves decision-making to a small minority of unmarried men.  Unfortunately, they are more akin to a secular pyramidal corporation rather than a college of Apostles whose mission is to teach, govern and sanctify through sacrament and example, the whole People of God.  Real change against abuse must start with essential change to the Church's clergy/lay structure.  Two changes we consider essential to restore the credibility of the teaching authority of the Church are the inclusion of women in all ministries of the Church and the end to mandatory celibacy.

We speak as women and men who love the Church and have accepted, in prophetic obedience to the Holy Spirit, to exercise a leadership of service within Catholic faith communities, tending the broken souls of those wounded by the Church.  We minister to victims of clergy sexual harassment, exploitation and assault, and to their families. We also journey with offending priests to help them find forgiveness and healing.

The absence of women in positions of ecclesial authority denies the Church the wisdom and insight women bring to the processes of discernment and decision making.  Patriarchal gender stereotyping silences the voice of half of humanity. Women know from experience that the hierarchy of the Catholic Church is a primary carrier of the global toxic virus of misogyny and the violence it engenders. The cure for that virus is equality: the inclusion of women in all ministries of the Church so that men and women are equal partners in gathering and shepherding God's people.

Further, if the Church would recognize the dual call to priesthood as well as marriage, the insights of family life would enrich the ministry of its priests as it does with its deacons. An end to mandatory celibacy would afford priests and bishops the emotional support and stability of family life (see Gen 2:18; I Tim 3:2-5) and would provide a role model for parishioners. This is not to say that we do not honour the charism of celibacy in those who receive it.

The members (women and men) of Roman Catholic Women Priests Canada join their voices with all who hope that your meeting in Rome will produce the real changes necessary to restructure Church governance.  A conversion from clericalism and entitlement to service is imperative in order to heal the grave wounds to the Body of Christ and move the Church into the 21st century.

We earnestly pray that the Spirit will guide your deliberations and your decision making, to bring the Church out of the darkness into Christ's light, "for the Holy Spirit Itself is a burning and shining serenity, which cannot be nullified, and which enkindles ardent virtue so as to put all darkness to light" (St. Hildegard of Bingen).

Respectfully,
 
+ Jane Kryzanowski, Regina, SK, Bishop for RCWP Canada

February 1, 2019




Contents

  • Open letter to Archbishop Lionel Gendron, President Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, Canadian delegate to Worldwide Meeting of Bishops on Abuse Crisis
  • Clerical Sex Abuse Conference called by Pope Francis with heads of Bishops Conferences
  • Roman Catholic Woman Ordained a Priest in J’burg South Africa
  • 55 years of struggle for women's ordination in the Catholic Church
  • Culture Wars and Women’s Bodies: Why the Catholic Church is Implicated in the Politics of the Far Right
  • My Heart Goes Out to the Girls and the Women
  • Not an Africa problem, it is a church problem -- it's the difference between males and females and those in the church who have power -- Women religious shatter the silence about clergy sexual abuse of sisters
  • Gillette’s #MeToo-inspired Super Bowl ad represents a cultural shift
  • Give Us This Day short videos on the lives of Oscar Romero, Dorthy Day, Thérèse Martin, Francis of Assisi, Teresa of Calcuta
  • Commission members on the diaconate of women speak publically for the first time
  • Final Document of the Synod of Bishops on Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment
  • Featured Link
  • Tech Tip
  • RCWP Canada Bishop's Message
  • Episcopal ordination videos
  • Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan
  • The Pope’s Bold Plan for Rebuilding the Church is Being Ignored
  • Jesus’ Baptism: His Wasted Life — and Our’s
  • Women strive for larger roles in male-dominated religions
  • Comments to the Editor
  • Free access to on-line or pdf downloadable books and book-length articles
  • Francis Comic Strip
  • Form for Comments to the Editor
  • Links to RCWP Canada website and other progressive websites and blogs




Search
index site map advanced
search engine by freefind




       

RCWP Canada Bishop's Message

Over the past months I have been asked to speak about Roman Catholic Women Priest. People want to know who we are, what we are about and how I became a priest. In the next few issues of The Review I will address these questions by sharing some of the notes from a recent public presentation I made. As with any of my messages, I welcome your comments and questions.


Part II.  Roman Catholic Women Priests are a CRY FOR JUSTICE

My vocation is intertwined with the eruption that happened around the time of Vatican Council II.

When did you first know you were called to be a priest?

I recall clearly when I first knew I wanted to be a priest.  About Grade 7 (mid 50's) the parish priest visited our class. “Who wants to be a priest?” he asked.  I think he forgot to include the word “boys” in his question.  “Who of you boys wants to be a priest?” At least I didn't hear it.  My hand shot up.  And I was shot down.  I was told in no uncertain terms, “Only boys can be priests. Girls can be sisters.”  I was devastated. 

Reprimanded by the priest and sister and teased by my classmates. I felt humiliated. I was broken hearted and crushed in spirit.

On another occasion we had a vocation play for the rest of the school. I was stuffed into a nun's habit and played the part of the sister while my arch-nemesis in the class was the patriarchal priest.

But I knew I was called to serve God. So, when I graduated from high school, I entered a convent. Being a naive 17, I didn't really know what that meant.  But, exploring the inner longing I was experiencing was the beginning of a life-long journey of responding to the Divine wooing.


Read More

+Jane

[Jane Kryzanowski, Regina, SK, is bishop for RCWP Canada.]




Episcopal ordination videos


Editor, Special to The Review | February 1, 2019

The episcopal ordination of Bishop Jane Kryzanowski, July 21, 2018 and the public presentation that preceded it on July 20, were video recorded.  They are now available to the public on YouTube. 

The public presentation was a panel of Bishops Marie, Nancy and Jane V.  entitled "Noisy Women" or Faithful Servants?  There are three videos – one for each of three segments of the presentation:  
    Part 1 – Why I Am Still Roman Catholic
    Part 2 – Experiencing Migration from Exile to the Living Gospel
    Part 3.-  Favourite Gospel Passage That Gives Hope

There are four videos for the ordination, each corresponding to parts of the liturgy:
    Part 1 – Liturgy of the Word
    Part 2 – Liturgy of Ordination
    Part 3 – Liturgy of Eucharist
    Part 4 – Bishop Jane's comments and blessing

To view one or all videos click here: RCWP Canada YouTube Channel





Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan


Allyson Stevenson, theconversation.com | January 13, 2019

Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013.

Although Indigenous activism in Canada has a long history, the origin stories of official and formalized organizations are hidden from common view because of gaps in history books and media accounts. The early formations of Indigenous women’s organizing in Saskatchewan is an example of these resilient stories hidden from history.

Read More




Jesus’ Baptism: His Wasted Life — and Our’s

Mike Rivage-Seul, mikerivageseul.wordpress.com | January 13, 2019

In the context of the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, let’s think about baptism and the differences between the understandings we’ve inherited and those reflected in the practice of John the Baptist and Jesus of Nazareth. Those differences hold practical implications for our own lives as we wrestle with a faith that may have lost meaning for us, and as we struggle with the relative smallness and insignificance of our lives.

Read More





Women strive for larger roles in male-dominated religions

David Crary, religionnews.com | January 15, 2019

Women have been elected heads of national governments on six continents. They have flown into space, served in elite combat units and won every category of Nobel Prize. The global #MeToo movement, in 15 months, has toppled a multitude of powerful men linked to sexual misconduct.

Yet in most of the world’s major religions, women remain relegated to a second-tier status. Women in several faiths are still barred from ordination. Some are banned from praying alongside men and forbidden from stepping foot in some houses of worship altogether. Their attire, from headwear down to the length of their skirts in church, is often restricted.

But women around the world in recent months have been finding new ways to chip away at centuries of male-dominated traditions and barriers, with many of them emboldened by the surge of social media activism that’s spread globally in the #MeToo era.

Read More








This was suggested to me by a Mennonite friend as a reading for a Unity Week Prayer Vigil.

WE ACTIVELY OPPOSE all that leads to violence among people and nations,
and violence to other species and to our own planet.
Refusal to fight with weapons is not surrender.
We are not passive when threatened by the greedy, the cruel, the tyrant, the unjust.
We will struggle to remove the causes of impasse and confrontation by every means of nonviolent resistance available.
We must start with our own hearts and minds.
Together, let us reject the clamor of fear and listen to the whisperings of hope.
        (From a Statement on Peace, New Zealand Quakers, 1987)

[Marie Bouclin, Sudbury, ON, is RCWP Canada bishop-emerita]





Free access to on-line or pdf downloadable books and book-length articles:


195 Reasons Why Women Should Be Ordained
       by Editor, RCWP Canada Monthly Review
       
Women Priests -- Answering the Call
      by Catherine Cavanaugh

Gaudete et Exsultate
     by Pope Francis

Why Women Should Be Priests
     by Roy Bourgeois

Women Priests - A Catholic Commentary on the Vatican Declaration
      edited by Leonard Swidler and Arlene Swidler


Dancing My Life, Dancing My God 

      by Judith Pellerin

Binding The Strong Man, Ched Myers’ extraordinary political reading of Mark’s Gospel

Digging out the Roots of Spiritual Abuse
by Craig Van Parys


An Empire of Misogyny?
by Tina Beattie

Pope Francis:  Fraternal and Spontaneous
       by Antonio Spadaro

Seeking Refuge

Shamed into Silence, Called Out to Proclaim

c







Clerical Sex Abuse Conference called by Pope Francis with heads of Bishops Conferences

Rene Reid, catholicchurchreform.org | December 30, 2018

We have been in communication with Fr. Hans Zollner, a Jesuit priest, a German theologian and psychologist, and one of the leading experts on sexual abuse working in the Catholic Church. He is one of the planners for the February summit called by Pope Francis with heads of all the Bishops' Conferences worldwide to address the issue of the Sex Abuse Crisis. Fr. Zollner has invited us to provide input to the organizing committee.

This is our opportunity to have direct involvement in this critical gathering. We have drafted the letter below and would appreciate your support by sending this letter on to your bishop and local media.


Read More





Roman Catholic Woman Ordained a Priest in J’burg South Africa


Judith Lee, judyabl.blog | January 20, 2019



It is with great joy that we report that Dianne Willman, 44, was ordained a Roman Catholic Priest on January 19, 2019 in Klipkerk at Mosaiek, Fairland, Johannesburg, South Africa at 2:00 PM South African time. Bishop Patricia Fresen of Roman Catholic Women Priests (International RCWP) was the ordaining bishop.

The sacred ordination following traditional form was attended by loved ones and supporters filled with the Spirit and happiness for her and for the Roman Catholic Church sorely in need of renewal and new servant leadership. Rev. Caryl Conroy Johnson of the USA, Eastern Region of RCWP also attended the holy Mass. The Mass of Holy Orders is essentially traditional except that the ordinand prostrates herself before the altar and not before the bishop.

Read More




55 years of struggle for women's ordination in the Catholic Church

Editor, Special to The Review | February 1, 2019

A lifelong commitment by theologian Ida Raming, together with like-minded pioneers, some of whom are deceased, is demonstrated in this documentation on the struggle for women's ordination in the Catholic Church.

Starting with the Vatican Council (1962 - 1965) she describes this commitment during several church history phases through to the present. With the use of numerous pertinent documents she describes the developments, conflicts and international movements of the struggle, providing an excellent resourse for the study of an important part of Church history.

Ida Raming, Dr. Theol., Universities of Münster and Freiburg im Breisgau, is Bishop for RCWP-Germany.

Editor's Note:  This book is currently available only in German.  Click here for flyer, in German, including ordering information.




Culture Wars and Women’s Bodies: Why the Catholic Church is Implicated in the Politics of the Far Right

Tina Beattie, 
go_rebuild_my_house | January 10, 2019

In 2017, Antonio Spadaro SJ, editor of La Civiltà Cattolica, and Presbyterian pastor Marcelo Figueroa, editor of the Argentinian edition of L’Osservatore Romano, co-wrote an article on America’s culture wars titled “Evangelical Fundamentalism and Catholic Integralism: A Surprising Ecumenism.

The article provoked widespread debate, but today it seems even more relevant and accurate in its analysis than when it was first published. It refers to “an ecumenism of hate” expressed in a “xenophobic and Islamophobic vision that wants walls and purifying deportations” that finds common ground around issues such as “abortion, same-sex marriage, religious education in schools and other matters generally considered moral or tied to values.”

Over and against this “ecumenism of conflict,” the authors posit Pope Francis’s “ecumenism that moves under the urge of inclusion, peace, encounter and bridges” in which “the contribution of Christianity to a culture is that of Christ washing the feet.”

Read More




My Heart Goes Out to the Girls and the Women

Catherine Mulroney, go_rebuild_my_house | November 29, 2018

The results of the recent Pennsylvania grand jury report on clergy sexual abuse are as stark as they are staggering. They may also be surprising, because while we have long wrung our hands over the tragedy of priestly abuse, seeing the report’s statistics in aggregate may be the first time many Catholics fully understand just how many female victims have been preyed upon over the years by priests.

While the first image of a victim may be a choir boy or altar boy, just shy of a quarter of victims in the cases studied were females: girls, teens and women, suffering at the hands of men they trusted as pastors, teachers, counselors, family friends.

Read More




Not an Africa problem, it is a church problem -- it's the difference between males and females and those in the church who have power -- Women religious shatter the silence about clergy sexual abuse of sisters

Gail DeGeorge, globalsistersreport.org | January 21, 2019

Galvanized by the #MeToo movement and the sex abuse crisis commanding the attention of the Vatican, women religious are now openly discussing a subject that was once taboo — sexual harassment, abuse and rape of sisters by clergy — in congregational motherhouses and national conference offices.

Slowly, an era is ending in which Catholic women religious were silent victims of sexual abuse by priests and bishops. Consider these developments in the past year:

Read More




Gillette’s #MeToo-inspired Super Bowl ad represents a cultural shift

Andrea Benoit, theconversation.com | January 21, 2019

 Gillette has already dropped what is likely to be the most talked about 2019 Super Bowl commercial. “We believe” refers directly to the #MeToo movement, sexual harassment and bullying, and the commercial has generated lots of buzz because of its use of images of “toxic masculinity.”

Read More and view commercials




Give Us This Day short videos on the lives of Oscar Romero, Dorthy Day,  Thérèse Martin, Francis of Assisi, Teresa of Calcuta



Give Us This Day and The Sheen Center For Thought & Culture come together to tell the story of ordinary men and women whose extraordinary lives inspire the moral imagination and give witness to the myriad ways of holiness.

The text for these short videos is taken from Blessed Among Us by Robert Ellsberg and drawn from the acclaimed column of the same name in Give Us This Day.

Watch videos




Commission members on the diaconate of women speak publically for the first time

CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE, catholicregister.org  | January 17, 2019

Ordaining women to the permanent diaconate now, when the church is "crying for ministry," is a logical way to fulfill its obligation to bring the Gospel to all people, according to panelists at a Jan 15 event at Jesuit-run Fordham University in New York.

There is incontrovertible evidence that women served as deacons in the early church, they said.

Two speakers at the event on "The Future of Women Deacons" are members of a commission on the diaconate of women established in August 2016 by Pope Francis to review the theology and history of the office of deacon. The group met over a two-year period and submitted its report to the Pope in late 2018.

Read More






Final Document of the Synod of Bishops on Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment


Irish Catholic Bishops Conference, catholicbishops.ie | January 11, 2019


The Synod is an assembly of bishops from around the world who gather with the Holy Father, Pope Francis, to share their wisdom and experiences in the common pursuit of pastoral solutions which have a universal validity and application.  

Taking place every three years, the 15th General Assembly of the Synod of Bishops was held in Rome, from 3 – 28 October, 2018, on the theme ‘Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment’.  

Final Document of the Synod of Bishops on Young People, Faith and Vocational Discernment




The Pope’s Bold Plan for Rebuilding the Church is Being Ignored

Robert Mickens, go_rebuild_my_house | December 20, 2018

There is arguably no papal document since the end of the Second Vatican Council (1962-65) that has mapped out such a radical reform of Church governance, life and mission as Pope Francis’ apostolic exhortation Evangelii gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel).

It is the blueprint for what the pope’s Secretary of State, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, has called a “paradigm shift” towards a more decentralized, synodal and missionary Church for the next millennium.

Read More






Featured Link
 
Several articles in this issue of The Review are linked to 
Go, Rebuild My House blogsite.





Tech Tip


This web page looks best if View/Zoomed to 100% in Internet Explorer, but 75% for Chrome, Opera, Safari and Firefox.





Francis, the comic strip                                                                                           Francis Comic Strip Archive                
by Pat Marrin | January 15, 2019
National Catholic Reporter
Used with permission
                                                                                                       





RCWP Canada | Eucharistic Communities Ordinations Contact | Search | Archives Donate | Are you called to be a priest?
 Homilies | Francis Comic Strip Archive | Facebook



Home| About Us | Contact Us | ©2019 RCWP Canada